The Bolin Centre has appointed an external scientific advisory group comprised of leading national and international scientists within climate research. The group’s main tasks are to inform the Bolin Centre of its strengths, weaknesses and possibilities for development as well as increase the Bolin Centre’s contacts to international networks and research groups within the climate research area.

Current members:

Jay FamigliettiJay Famiglietti

Canada 150 Research Chair in Hydrology and Remote Sensing
Executive Director, Global Institute for Water Security
Professor, School of Environment and Sustainability, and Department of Geography and Planning, University of Saskatchewan
https://water.usask.ca/about/profiles/people/jay-famiglietti.php

Professor Famiglietti is a hydrologist who uses satellites and develops advanced computer models to track how freshwater availability is changing around the globe. He has been on the faculties of the University of Texas at Austin and the University of California, Irvine. Before moving to the University of Saskatchewan, he served for 4 years as the Senior Water Scientist at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) at the California Institute of Technology. He is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and of the Geological Society of America; and he is a frequent speaker, an avid writer, a regular advisor to governments on water security issues, and he is committed to science communication.

Karen KohfeldKaren Kohfeld
Associate Professor
Climate, Oceans, and Paleo-Environments (COPE) Lab at Simon Fraser University, Canada
www.sfu.ca/rem/people/profiles/kohfeld.html
kohfeld@sfu.ca

Dr. Kohfeld is interested in understanding natural variability and biogeochemical linkages within the ocean and climate system, in order to better assess earth system responses to anthropogenic perturbations. Her research focuses on natural and anthropogenic changes in the ocean carbon cycle, the influence of climate and land surface conditions on atmospheric dust, and assessing and adapting to extreme weather conditions in British Columbia.

Ulrike LohmannUlrike Lohmann
Professor
Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science, ETH Zürich, Switzerland
https://iac.ethz.ch/people-iac/person-detail.html?persid=121007
ulrike.lohmann@env.ethz.ch

Dr. Lohmann’s research focuses on the role of aerosol particles and clouds in the climate system. Her specific interests are cloud microphysical processes including the formation of cloud droplets and ice crystals and the influence of aerosol particles on the radiation balance and on the hydrological cycle in the present, past and future climate. She combines laboratory work and field measurements on cloud and aerosol microphysics with the representation of them in different numerical models for addressing basic and applied research questions.

Camille Parmesan
Professor
NMA Chair in Public Understanding of Marine Science & Human Health
School of Biological & Marine Sciences, Plymouth University, UK
www.plymouth.ac.uk/staff/camille-parmesan
camille.parmesan@plymouth.ac.uk

My research focuses on the biological impacts of anthropogenic climate change on wild species and the implications for conserving biodiversity under future, rapid global warming. I work on impacts at the population level (on butterfly-host plant interactions), and at a global-scale analysing biological responses to climate change across all taxonomic groups. I am an advisor for several conservation NGOs and am a Coordinating Lead Author for the upcoming 6th IPCC Assessment.

Maureen E. RaymoMaureen E. Raymo
Bruce C. Heezen Lamont Research Professor
Director at Lamont-Doherty Core Repository of Columbia University
www.ldeo.columbia.edu/user/raymo
raymo@ldeo.columbia.edu

Professor Raymo is a paleoceanographer/marine geologist who studies the history and causes of climate change in the Earth’s past. Her research revolves around understanding the history of the ice ages and particularly how sea level has changed in the recent past. In addition to publishing foundational work on the stratigraphy and chronology of recent geologic epochs, Raymo has proposed hypotheses explaining why ice ages occur in Earth’s history, why ice sheets wax and wane with characteristic frequencies over the last few million years, and developed new ways of studying past sea level change.

Veerabhadran RamanathanVeerabhadran Ramanathan
Distinguished Professor of Atmospheric and Climate Sciences at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego
https://scripps.ucsd.edu/labs/ramanathan/aboutcurriculum-vitae
vramanathan@ucsd.edu

Professor Ramanathan discovered the greenhouse effect of CFCs in 1975 and showed that a ton each of CFC-11 and CFC-12 has more global warming effect than 10000 tons of CO2. This discovery established the now accepted fact that non-CO2 gases are a major contributor to planet warming and also enabled the Montreal protocol to become the first successful climate mitigation policy. He was honored as the science advisor to Pope Francis’ Holy See delegation to the historic 2015 Paris climate summit and in addition advises California Governor Jerry Brown. He was named the UN Climate Champion in 2013, and has been elected to the US National Academy and the Royal Swedish Academy which awards the Nobel Prize.