2019 Bolin Seminars

Welcome to the Bolin Centre Seminar Series!

The host is Research Area 8: Biodiversity and climate

Spatial variation in phenology and its impact on trophic interactions

Speaker: Albert Phillimore | University of Edinburgh
Time: September 24 at 13h00–14h00
Place: Ahlmannsalen, Geoscience Building

Abstract
We have abundant evidence that warmer springs are causing spring phenological events in high latitude environments to advance, with some concern that previously synchronous trophic interactions will become mismatched. I will examine what we can learn by taking a spatial approach, such as the relationship between temperature and optimum timing and the potential for mismatch to be spatially buffered. I will discuss analyses of citizen science datasets and work arising from a 200km transect looking at a simple woodland food chain in Scotland.

 

Welcome to the Bolin Centre Seminar Series!

The host is Research Area 3: Hydrosphere, Cryosphere and Climate
and Research Area 7: Landscape processes and climate

Tracking atmospheric moisture to assess Indias water resources, Himalaya glaciers and  the Amazon rainforest

Speaker: Obbe Tuinenburg |Utrecht University
Time: May 22 at 13h00–14h00
Place: Ahlmannsalen, Geoscience Building

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Welcome to the Bolin Centre Seminar Series!

The host is Research Area 4: Biogeochemical cycles and climate

Using land-based sites for air-sea interaction studies
Östergarnsholm and the Baltic Sea carbon budget

Speaker: Anna Rutgersson |Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University
Time: May 16 at 13h00–14h00
Place: De Geersalen, Geoscience Building

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Welcome to the Bolin Centre Seminar Series!

The host is Research Area 1: Ocean-atmosphere dynamics and climate

Part 1: Arctic climate change and interactions with lower latitudes

Part 2: Assessing Earth’s climate sensitivity

Speaker: Torben Koenigk |SMHI and Thorsten Mauritsen | MISU
Time: April 25 at 13h00–14h00
Place: Högbomsalen, Geoscience Building

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Welcome to the Bolin Centre Seminar Series!

The host is Research Area 3: Hydrosphere, Cryosphere and Climate

Terrestrial moisture recycling: a land-atmosphere process with governance appeal

Speaker: Lan Wang Erlandsson, Stockholm Resilience, Stockholm University
Time: March 27 at 13h00–14h00
Place: Ahlmannsalen, Geoscience Building



Abstract:
A large portion of evaporation, interception and transpiration from land comes down again as precipitation over land. This atmospheric part of the water cycle referred to as terrestrial moisture recycling is, thus, a land-atmosphere interaction process that allows land management decisions to influence precipitation, with further knock-on implications for downwind land and water resources. For example, deforestation – through reduced rainfall –  may result in drought-related self-amplified forest loss, changes in river flows, and crop failure.
These insights have piqued the interests from researchers and practitioners working with resource management and governance: Should the moisture from forest be considered an ecosystem service? Should the moisture transfer between countries be regulated and governed? In the latest UN Water report, moisture recycling was also labelled a “natural-based solution”. At the same time, it is clear that the complex links between land-use change and rainfall go beyond moisture recycling.
This lecture aims to give a brief overview of the branch of moisture recycling research that crossed over from the climate and hydrology science communities, to appeal to social science disciplines. I also view this lecture as an opportunity for a broader conversation on the challenges and dilemmas of translating biophysical insights to useful tools in management and governance.

Fika will be served afterwards

Welcome!

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Welcome to the Bolin Centre Seminar Series!

The host is Research Area 2: Clouds, aerosols, turbulence and climate

Aerosol-cloud interactions in the Arctic – Recent results from our observations on Svalbard and the high Arctic

Speaker: Paul Zieger, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry | ACES, Stockholm University
Time: March 15 at 13h00–14h00
Place: Ahlmannsalen, Geoscience Building



Abstract:
The Arctic experiences dramatic changes due to climate warming. The underlying processes of the observed changes are not fully understood, yet they propagate through the entire global climate system with impacts on weather, ecosystems and geopolitics. Aerosol particles and clouds play a major role in that system and are among the main contributors to the overall uncertainties. At the Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry at Stockholm University we are using various in-situ techniques to study the properties of aerosols and clouds. In particular, we are using a counterflow virtual impactor inlet which is able to separate activated from non-activated particles and thus allows to study the microphysical and chemical properties of cloud condensation nuclei in high detail. In my talk, I will present results from our observations at Zeppelin observatory on Spitsbergen as well as recent results from the ‘Arctic Ocean 2018’ expedition to the high Arctic on board the Swedish icebreaker Oden.

Fika will be served afterwards

Welcome!

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Welcome to the first seminar in the Bolin Centre Seminar Series!

The host is Research Area 5: Historical to millennial climate variability

A late-glacial climate perspective on extreme European summers like 2018

Speaker: Frederik Schenk, Department of Geological Sciences, Stockholm University
Time: February 20 at 13h00–14h00
Place: Ahlmannsalen, Geoscience Building



Abstract:
Since the 1980s, years with major European heatwaves coincide with a “warming hole” of unusually cold North Atlantic sea-surface-temperatures (SST) around the subpolar gyre southeast of Greenland. The observed “warming hole” relative to global warming trends results from a particular SST fingerprint related to a ~15% slowdown of the Atlantic Overturning Circulation (AMOC) since the middle of the 20th century. Climate models reproduce a similar SST fingerprint in response to a slowdown of the AMOC under future warming scenarios.

In this presentation, I will show that this SST fingerprint was also present during extreme cases of an abrupt slowdown of the AMOC during the rapid warming phase at the end of the late glacial (~15–11ka BP). The atmospheric response to the “warming hole” suggests an intensification of blocking high pressure systems over the NE-Atlantic during summer giving rise to unusually warm and dry conditions across Europe. The extreme late-glacial summer conditions find support in new multi-proxy data which indicate extended paleo-heatwaves and droughts during weak AMOC states.

Fika will be served afterwards

Welcome!

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Bolin Centre for Climate Research
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