2018 Bolin Seminars

Welcome to the third seminar in the Bolin Centre Seminar Series!

The host is Research Area 1: Ocean-atmosphere dynamics and climate

Contrasting the Hydrological Cycle in Past and Future Warm Climates – with implications for Ocean Overturning Circulation

Natalie Burls, Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic & Earth Sciences, George Mason UniversitySpeaker: Natalie Burls, Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic & Earth Sciences, George Mason University
Time: March 8 at 11h15–12h15
Place: Ahlmannsalen, Geoscience Building

The lectures will usually be streamed and saved on the Bolin Centre website.



Abstract:
During the warm Miocene and Pliocene epochs, subtropical regions had enough precipitation to support rich vegetation and fauna. Only with global cooling and the onset of glacial cycles some 3 million years ago, towards the end of the Pliocene, did the broad patterns of arid and semi-arid subtropical regions become fully developed. However, current projections of future global warming caused by CO2 rise generally suggest the intensification of dry conditions over these subtropical regions, rather than the return to a wetter state. What makes future projections different from these past warm climates? In an effort to answer this question, this talk focuses specifically on the warm Pliocene – the most recent time in Earth’s history during which reconstructed atmospheric CO2 concentrations are estimated to have been in the region of 400ppm. We investigate this question by comparing a typical quadrupling-of-CO2 experiment with a simulation driven by sea surface temperatures closely resembling available reconstructions for the early Pliocene. Sensitivity studies exploring cloud controls on tropical climate, and theoretical arguments inferring Pliocene cloud radiative forcing will be discussed, as well as implications for the meridional ocean overturning circulation in the Pacific basin during the Pliocene.

A lunch sandwich will be served, please e-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. if you would like one.

Welcome!

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Welcome to the second seminar in the Bolin Centre Seminar Series!

The host is Research Area 5: Historical to millennial climate variability

Climates hidden in Peat

Speaker: Professor Antonio Martínez Cortizas, Department of Edaphic and Chemical Agronomy, University of Santiago de la Compostela
Time: February 21 at 11h15–12h15
Place: Högbomsalen, Geoscience Building

The lectures will usually be streamed and saved on the Bolin Centre website.



Abstract:
For more than a century peatlands have been widely used as archives of environmental change. Peat records of biotic (as pollen, diatoms, testate amoebas, plant and animal remains) and abiotic (lithogenic elements, trace metals, isotopes, etc.) proxies has enabled the reconstruction of changes in vegetation, soil erosion, atmospheric pollution and climate, at local and regional scales. At the same time, they are amongst the most sensitive and responsive ecosystems to climate changes, expressed as modifications in surface vegetation, peat organic matter decomposition, ability to bind/sequester chemical elements, and so forth. 

Through three case studies, this talk will exemplify this ambivalent potential of the use peat records: how can we extract climatic signals from peat (using unusual and usual peat properties), and how this signal helps us to understand the role of climate on the biogechemical cycling of atmospheric deposited elements.

A lunch sandwich will be served, please e-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. if you would like one.

Welcome!

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Welcome to the first seminar in the Bolin Centre Seminar Series!

The host is Research Area 2: Clouds, aerosols, turbulence and climate

Atmospheric Ice Nucleating Particles: Why we care and what we know!

Speaker: Dr. Heike Wex, Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Researchk, Germany
Time: January 23 at 11h15–12h15
Place: Ahlmannsalen, Geoscience Building

The lectures will usually be streamed and saved on the Bolin Centre website.

Abstract:
Ice columns growing on a slab of feldspar, shortly after ice active sites on the feldspar nucleated the ice.  A. Kiselev et al., Science 10.1126/science.aai8034 (2016).Ice nucleating particles induce the ice formation in clouds and through this influence weather and climate. While first knowledge about them was gained already some decades ago, research on them kicked up in recent years, leading to new insights. But there are still important open  issues we need to understand.
The presentation will give an overview of the existing knowledge, starting from findings in the old days, focusing on new results and also mentioning open issues.

Lunch sandwich: Will be served, please e-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. if you would like one.

Welcome!

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Bolin Centre for Climate Research
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