Events Calendar

Bolin Centre Seminar Series | Research Area 6

Welcome to the sixth seminar in the Bolin Centre Seminar Series!

The host is Research Area 6: Deep time climate variability

The rise and fall of the Cretaceous Hot Greenhouse climate

Brian T. Huber, Department of Paleobiology, Smithsonian Institution. Photo: Jim DiLoretoSpeaker: Brian T. Huber, Department of Paleobiology, Smithsonian Institution
Curator of Foraminifera, Research Geologist, IODP Exp 369 co-chief

Time: October 10 at 11h00–12h00
Place: Ahlmannsalen, Geoscience Building

The lectures will usually be streamed and saved on the Bolin Centre website.



Abstract:
A compilation of foraminiferal stable isotope measurements from southern high latitude (SHL) deep-sea sites provides a novel perspective important for understanding Earth’s paleotemperature and paleoceanographic changes across the rise and fall of the Cretaceous Hot Greenhouse climate and the subsequent Paleogene climatic optimum. Oxygen isotope records suggest similar trends in both bottom and surface water temperatures in the southern sectors of the South Atlantic and in the Indian Ocean basins. Warm conditions were present throughout the Albian, extreme warmth existed during the Cretaceous Thermal Maximum (early-mid-Turonian) through late Santonian, and long-term cooling began in the Campanian and culminated in Cretaceous temperature minima during the Maastrichtian. In absolute terms, paleotemperature estimates suggest sub-Antarctic bottom waters were ≥21°C and sub-Antarctic surface waters were ≥27°C during the Turonian, values warmer than published climate models support. This Cretaceous Thermal Maximum exceed peak Paleogene temperatures at the same locations by at least 8°C. The standard explanation for the sustained warmth during Cretaceous Hot Greenhouse climate invokes higher atmospheric CO2 levels from volcanic outgassing, but correlation among temperature estimates, proxy estimates of pCO2, and intervals of high fluxes of both mafic and silicic volcanism are mostly poor. This comparison demonstrates that the relative timing between events and their putative consequences need to be better constrained to test and more fully understand relationships among volcanism, pCO2, temperature ocean circulation, Earth’s biota and the carbon cycle.
Antarctica 100 million years ago. Copyright Bob Nicholls 2006, (paleocreations.com)

 

A lunch sandwich will be served, please e-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. if you would like one.

Welcome!

 

The lecture will be streamed and you can watch it live here: https://connect.sunet.se/bolincentre. It will also be saved on the Bolin Centre website.

 

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